How to define a house style: What makes a Creole home?

Louisiana is an extraordinary place. The Creole home is a unique style of architecture found in Louisiana and the surrounding areas. Although you are less likely to find this home in New Orleans than in New Orleans, this does not negate the rich history and unique makeup that this home style offers.

Louisiana is an extraordinary place. The Creole home is a unique style of architecture found in Louisiana and the surrounding areas. Although you are less likely to find this home in New Orleans than in New Orleans, this does not negate the rich history and unique makeup that this home style offers.

This in-depth review will examine the Creole home. Its complex origins, two sub-types, and some of its defining characteristics are all covered. Continue reading to discover what makes this style of architecture so unique.

This in-depth review will examine the Creole home. Its complex origins, two sub-types, and some of its defining characteristics are all covered. Continue reading to discover what makes this style of architecture so unique.

The Creole home: History

The history of the word “Creole” is complex and varied. It can refer to ethnic heritage, recipes, or musical styles. The history of Creole architecture is similar. It comes from many different sources. We don’t know the origins of Creole architecture.

However, we know that Creole architecture did not evolve from an adaptation to the environment. Cultural influences formed Creole architecture from the many settlers who made the Mississippi Valley their home. Many believe Creole architecture is due to the presence of French Canadian settlers in this area. Some believe it is French. Others argue that it is more West Indian influence.

Complicating matters, Spanish settlers in Spain at the time responded to two fires that destroyed Creole homes in the late 1700s.

Different types of Creole homes

There are two major types of Creole homes. These are the ways you can distinguish them.

Creole Cottage

The Creole cottage, the smallest of the two house types mentioned above, is also the oldest. These houses have anywhere from one to four bedrooms and no hallways. These cottages, however, are not like the shotgun house that is similar to this area. Instead, their rooflines run parallel to the street and either side-by-side. A second story is available for bedrooms. These homes are popular in rural areas for their large front porches. They meet on the street in New Orleans because space is limited.

Creole Townhouse

Perhaps the most famous Creole townhouse is its presence in New Orleans’s French Quarter. These houses were built after the Great New Orleans Fire of 1788. These homes are made from brick or stucco and not wood. They are also more resistant to fire. This Creole home has thick walls, cast-iron balconies, open courtyards and arcades. They also show both Spanish and French influences with their dormers and steeply pitched roofs.

The key features of Creole homes

Although the Creole homes are different, there are many similarities. Any defining characteristics do not unify this style. These are just a few of the highlights. Exterior What interior features should you look for in a Creole house?

Exterior

  • Each story has large front porches (also called galleries).
  • The gallery roof is a broad and spreading roofline.
  • Collettierte columns support gallery roofs

Interior

  • In the event of flooding, principal rooms above grade
  • There are no hallways connecting rooms
  • Many French doors
  • French wraparound mantels are common

 

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